The Canadian Peregrine Foundation

TORONTO HOME PAGE ARCHIVES

May - June 2000

Monday May 1, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  A male peregrine was on the foot of the west facing CIBC logo briefly at 11:30am.  At 5:40pm a male and female peregrine were on the same building.  The male was on the south west corner, the female on the foot of the west logo.  Both were gone by 6:10pm.

Tuesday May 2, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 9:45am a male peregrine was seen briefly on the north west corner of the CIBC roof.  He was back again at 4:40pm when he retrieved some prey that had been stored in a south facing concrete slot. With the prey in his talons, he quickly flew to the west, out of view.

Thursday May 4, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  A male peregrine was on the top of the west facing CIBC logo between 10:20am and 12:10pm.  He appeared to be preening and resting.

Sunday May 7, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Between 5:55 and 6:10am an unidentified peregrine was on the south west corner of the CIBC building.  There has also been a lot of kestrel activity around the Yonge and Bloor area in the past week.

Wednesday May 10, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:  Photos of Windwhistler-Spike now available!  Visit the Toronto Photo Gallery to see two pictures taken back in March, as Windwhistler-Spike perched on the west Bay logo.

Thursday May 11, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Between 7:40 and 8:15am a male peregrine, likely Windwhistler-Spike, was on the west side of the CIBC building.  He was back, this time on the top of the south CIBC logo at 4:50pm.  At 5:05pm he headed west, towards Bloor and Avenue Road.

Saturday May 12, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  A call from Katherine Rich at 9:00am placed Windwhistler-Spike on the south side of 77 Bloor West.  Apparently he had just had a bath in some roof water as he was completely wet.  A few minutes later he took off towards Yonge and Bloor, briefly attacking a crow en route. He was on the west side of the CIBC building at 9:40 until he moved to the south side at 10:40.  He remained there through the vicious storm until disappearing at 11:45am.  He reappeared on the northwest corner of the same building between 12:20 and 12:40pm and again briefly, at 1:20pm.

At 9:40am a female peregrine was on the bottom of the west CIBC logo.  She remained there until 11:25am.  She spent the whole time sleeping!  Her colouring was that of the original Mandy and was definitely not the dark young female that has been seen lately.

Saturday May 13, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 8:25am a male peregrine was on the north west corner of the CIBC building.  He relocated to the roof of 77 Bloor West at 8:45, remaining there for five minutes.

Sunday May 14, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  A male peregrine was seen briefly on the CIBC building at 7:35 and 9:30am.  A Red-tailed hawk cruised by heading west to east along Bloor at 2:40pm.

Monday May 15, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  A male peregrine was first seen at 5:55am flying above the CIBC
building, landing briefly on the foot of the south logo.  He reappeared, this time on the south east corner of the roof of 77 Bloor West at 6:25.  At 6:45 he flew south on Bay, fairly low.  He was briefly on the south east corner of the CIBC building at 8:05 and again at 8:45, this time eating on the south mid ledge.  He was gone from view at 9:00am.

Mark Nash reports:  I have just spoken to Bruce Massey this morning around 6:30am at the office about his observations of downtown nest site (on Saturday May 13th) - (Pounce-Kingsley and Victoria), and he watched several food packages being brought in to the nest ledge.  In addition, he observed BOTH the MALE and FEMALE off the nest hunting for food at the same time.  It would appear that we have chicks on the nest that are at least three to four days old - if the female is off the nest hunting at the same time as the male!!  Bruce has been monitoring the nest site, and all was quiet the week prior with NO food being brought in by either adults on Friday/Saturday/Sunday May 5th , 6th, 7th.  Maryanne and I were down atop the King Edward Hotel for several hours at the first of the week while doing a CBC interview, and once again, all was very quiet, no food being brought in, and the male Pounce-Kingsley was roosting on the National Trust building for several hours while we watched the nest ledge.  Because of the fact that both adults have now been observed off the nest hunting at the same time, I believe that we have had a hatch some where around the 10th of May.  This would be consistent behavior similar to Hamilton, and Etobicoke with similar age of chicks.  

Tuesday May 16, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 5:45am a male peregrine was on the north east roof of 77 Bloor West.  He moved to the east CIBC antenna at 6:00, remaining there until 6:50 when he moved to various other locations on the CIBC building.  He was gone by 7:20am.  He reappeared on the south mid ledge of the CIBC building between 11:00 and 11:40am and again at 4:45pm, circling above the CIBC building. 

Sharon Jocelyn reports:  (4:52 pm) I just witnessed Mandy taking on a red tailed hawk - she drove it up the Don Valley!!! It was something to see, however I was worried about both of them because they made contact two or three times!   I'm sure it was Mandy because she flew right over me after and she is definitely bigger than Windwhistler/Spike.  They are such beautiful creatures.

Wednesday May 17, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Mandy was first seen on the top of the west CIBC logo at 5:40am. She remained there until 7:05.  Shortly after, at 7:55am  she was seen eating on the west side of the CIBC building.  She moved to the east antenna of the same building at 8:30 and was still there at 8:50 when she moved to the foot of the west facing CIBC logo. Windwhistler-Spike appeared on the west side of the CIBC building, just under Mandy at 11:10.  Both birds disappeared from view at 11:35am.

Something quite unusual happened at 4:50pm.  Windwhistler-Spike flew over and landed on the west side of the CIBC building.  He landed on his chest and stayed that way until he flew off at 5:05pm.  During the time he was there he continually stretched his legs and wings, occasionally fanning his tail feathers.  He was back in the same spot at 5:35pm after circling a few times.  This time he was standing and looked normal in every way with the exception of performing a lot of stretching.  His flying ability looked normal.

Sharon Jocelyn reports:  It's 1:43 on Wednesday, and one of our peregrines is sitting on top of the antennae on the Bay.  Can't tell who?  Maybe someone else can see!  That's the first time I've seen one there in a few weeks.  He/her just tried to catch lunch, and all I saw were a few feathers floating by.

Thursday May 18, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 3:35pm both Mandy and Windwhistler-Spike appeared on the west side of the CIBC building.  Windwhistler-Spike disappeared from view between 4:00 and 5:05pm.  When he returned, he briefly mated with Mandy.  They were both gone by 5:50pm.

Friday May 19, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Mandy was on the top of the west CIBC logo between 5:55 and 6:30am.  At 7:05am both Mandy and Windwhistler-Spike were on the mid west side of the CIBC building.  Windwhistler-Spike spent most of the time sleeping while Mandy ate a whole pigeon.  Windwhistler-Spike left at 10:10.  Mandy moved to the top of the west CIBC logo at 12:40pm remaining there until 1:35pm.  Between 4:25 and 4:50pm Windwhistler-Spike was on the top of the west CIBC logo.

Saturday May 20, 2000
Harry Crawford reports: Windwhistler-Spike was on the west and south middle ledges of the CIBC building between 5:55 and 7:10am.  He was eating at 6:55am. Mandy was on the bottom of the west logo at 9:00am and still there at 9:15 when I had to leave the area.  He reappeared on the west mid ledge at 11:15; moved to the foot of the west logo at 12:30pm and finally disappeared at 4:00pm.  Most of the time was spent sleeping.

Mandy was in a slot mid way up the west side of the CIBC building from 11:30am until after 4:20pm when I had to leave the area.

Sunday May 21, 2000
Harry Crawford reports: Windwhistler-Spike was seen having breakfast on the west mid ledge of the CIBC building between 6:55 and 7:10am.

Monday May 22, 2000
Harry Crawford reports: Windwhistler-Spike was on the north west corner of the CIBC building between 8:35 and 9:10am.  Mandy was on the top of the west CIBC logo
between 10:55 and 11:35am.

Tuesday May 23, 2000
Harry Crawford reports: Between 9:40am and 12:15pm Windwhistler-Spike on the middle ledge on the west side of the CIBC building.  Mandy was in a slot just above him between 9:40am and 3:30pm when the fog was too thick to see anything.

Wednesday May 24, 2000
Harry Crawford reports: Mandy was briefly on the south west corner of 77 Bloor West at 7:20am.  She reappeared on the south side of the same building at 7:30, remaining there until 8:00am.

Thursday May 25, 2000
Harry Crawford reports: Windwhistler-Spike was on the south west corner of 77 Bloor West at 5:50, remaining there until 6:25am when he flew south along Bay.  He was briefly on the south west corner of the CIBC building at 6:55am. At 7:20am he was back on the south west corner of 77 Bloor West for 10 minutes.  Mandy was on the north east corner of the same building between 6:25 and 7:50am.  So for a while, both peregrines were on opposite sides of the building at the same time.  Later in the day they were both on the CIBC building for a short while.  At 4:20pm Windwhistler-Spike was on the west side of the building.  Mandy flew past nearly hitting him and he ran north along the ledge and disappeared.

Friday May 26, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Windwhistler-Spike was on the south west corner of 77 Bloor West briefly at 5:40am.  At 11:20 Mandy was on the top of the south CIBC logo remaining there until 11:40am.  She was briefly on the same spot at 1:20pm.  At 3:50pm Windwhistler-Spike took on two crows in the space between 55 Bloor West and 44 Charles West.  He landed briefly on a window ledge of 55 Bloor West to rest.  Both peregrines were on the south side of the CIBC building at 5:05pm; Mandy remaining until 5:45 and Windwhistler-Spike until 6:05pm.

Saturday May 27, 2000
Harry Crawford reports: Both peregrines were on the CIBC building for most of the morning. Windwhistler-Spike was first seen at 5:55am and was gone by 11:05am. Mandy was there between 7:55 and 10:05am.

Something quite unusual for the area took place between 1:30 and 3:15pm.  Five or more turkey vultures were circling the area and were repeatedly attacked by crows.  The vultures didn't appear to fight back.  They continually circled the area, preferring the CIBC building and were actually as low as five floors from the top at times.  I didn't see them land anywhere and they eventually moved north along Yonge Street.  The peregrines were nowhere to be seen during this time.

Sunday May 28, 2000
Harry Crawford reports: Windwhistler-Spike was seen flying south along Bay from 77 Bloor West at 7:25am.  He was seen briefly buzzing the apartment windows at 44 Charles West at 7:55am.

Monday May 29, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 6:00am both Windwhistler-Spike and Mandy were on the CIBC building.  Mandy was in a slot mid way up the west side of the building.  She remained there until 6:45am.  Windwhistler-Spike was on the south west corner of the roof until 6:10am.  A peregrine, which I couldn't identify, occupied the north west corner of the same building between 7:45 and 9:10am.

Both peregrines, Windwhistler-Spike and Mandy, were on the middle ledge of the west side of the CIBC building at 3:50pm.  Mandy left at 4:00pm.  At this time Windwhistler-Spike started to act very strangely, similar to what happened on Wednesday, May 17.  He squatted down facing the building, stretched out his wings and fanned his tail.  He just laid there for over half an hour, remaining quite still.  His beak opened from time to time.  At 4:35pm he abruptly stood up, stretched, and flew away.  This is weird!

Tuesday May 30, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Windwhistler-Spike was on the west side of the CIBC building between 10:50 and 11:20am.  There were workers nearby on the roof of 55 Bloor West at the time.  He reappeared briefly on the south east corner of 77 Bloor West and then headed east, towards Yonge and Bloor.

Wednesday May 31, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:  The downtown Toronto chicks were banded this morning.  There were three healthy chicks - two males and one female.  Additional details to follow.

Harry Crawford reports:  At 7:20am Windwhistler-Spike was soaring high above 77 Bloor West heading towards Yonge Street.  At 11:10am an unidentified peregrine was slowly circling above 44 Charles West.

Thursday June 1, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Windwhistler-Spike was mid way up the south west corner of the CIBC building between 8:15 and 8:40am.  He was back at 4:00pm, flying from the east over 55 Bloor West and landing on the north east corner of the roof of 77 Bloor West.  He immediately took off heading west above Bloor.  To unidentified peregrines were in the area at 4:30pm.  The first was on the south east corner of the roof of 55 Bloor West.  It dropped down to the roof area out of view at 4:40pm.  The second was in a slot mid way up the south side of the CIBC building.  It was gone by 5:15pm.  Unfortunately, both had their backs towards me and I couldn't positively identify them.

Saturday June 3, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Between 5:45 and 6:05am the adult female (not Mandy) was in a concrete slot on the south side of the CIBC building.  Windwhistler-Spike appeared on the south west corner of the same building at 6:40am and was on the 'h' of the south facing Bay sign at 7:10 removing the feathers from some prey.  He didn't eat but flew away with the prey at 7:20am.  The female peregrine was back on the top of the south facing CIBC logo for a short while at 12:35pm.

Sunday June 4, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  The adult female (not Mandy) was on the top of the south facing CIBC logo between 5:25 and 6:40am.  I'm not sure if she spent the night there or not.  An unidentified peregrine was circling high above Yorkville and Bay at 3:15pm.

Monday June 5, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Windwhistler-Spike started off on the south west corner of the CIBC building at 6:40am, moved to the south west corner of 77 Bloor West at 6:50 and finally flew out of view at 7:00am.  The immature female was briefly seen in a west slot mid way up the CIBC building at 7:10am.  Windwhistler-Spike was on the west side of the CIBC building briefly at 11:45am.

Tuesday June 6, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Windwhistler-Spike was briefly on the top of the west CIBC logo at 6:20am.  The immature female moved into a west slot mid way up the CIBC building at 7:15am remaining there until 7:50am.  She returned to the same spot at 8:50am and remained there until 12:30pm.  Windwhistler-Spike joined her on a mid slot just below her at 10:45am.  Both birds slept most of the time.  They woke up at 12:20pm, stretched and preened for 10 minutes and then flew away. What is interesting is that there were workers on the roof of 55 Bloor West all this time.  The peregrines paid no attention to them.

Wednesday June 7, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Windwhistler-Spike and the immature female were first seen on the south side of the CIBC building at 5:25am.  The female was in a concrete slot whereas Windwhistler-Spike appeared restless and moved around a lot.  He disappeared at 9:20 and she followed at 9:45am. The female was on the south west corner of the same building at 11:05 and remained there until 12 noon.  She was back in a south facing slot between 5:40 and 5:55pm.

Thursday June 8, 2000
Patricia Maitland reports:  One of the adults was repeatedly swooping down to the rooftop of the CFTR/680 building on Victoria St.  Must have been someone on the roof, I guess.  There was no sounds being made, though.  I came upon this and must have seen 10 or so circles and swoops, until finally he/she settled on one of the 'steps' of the National Trust building where I saw the other adult on the step below.  Don't know what all that was about.

Friday June 9, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  The female was on the top of the south facing CIBC logo at 6:05am. She moved over to the south west corner of 77 Bloor West at 6:20, remaining there until 6:50am.  Yesterday, she was briefly on the south side of 77 Bloor West at 5:45am.

Saturday June 10, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 5:35am the female (not Mandy) was on the south west corner of 77 Bloor West.  She remained there until 6:25am.  Spike made a rare brief appearance on the south east corner of 55 Bloor West at 6:35am.

Sunday June 11, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  The female was found in a south slot on the CIBC building at 5:25am. She moved over to the north east corner of 77 Bloor West at 6:15 and remained there until 6:50am.

Tuesday June 13, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  The local female (not Mandy) was in a west CIBC slot between 5:40 and 6:05am.  At 8:00am an unidentified peregrine, probably Windwhistler-Spike, was on the south west corner, mid way up the CIBC building with prey.  He immediately took off to the west with it without eating it.  This is the second time I've seen one of the peregrines prepare prey and take off somewhere else with it.  Could he be feeding another bird(s)?

At 4:00pm the local female appeared on the south west corner of 55 Bloor West.  She immediately jumped down out of view, on the roof area.  Her wing feathers could be seen fluttering  above the ledge. Sure enough, a few minutes later, a very wet bird appeared back on the south west corner.  At 4;05pm, after her bath, she disappeared from view.  At 4:25 Windwhistler-Spike made a rare appearance on the south west balcony of 55 Bloor West.  He disappeared at 4:35pm.

Yesterday, Windwhistler-Spike was seen for ten minutes on the southwest corner of the 55 Bloor West balcony.

Thursday June 15, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 6:20am both Windwhistler-Spike and the local female flew from the south, over 44 Charles West to land on the west and south west part of 55 Bloor West.  Windwhistler-Spike was out of view; the female then circled 77 Bloor West and eventually landed on the north east corner of 60 Bloor West.  She disappeared from view 5 minutes later. At 7:15am one of the peregrines was circling high above Yonge and Bloor.  Windwhistler-Spike had breakfast between 8:05 and 8:40am on the south ledge mid way up the CIBC building.  This time he ate the prey instead of taking it away somewhere.  He was later seen briefly on the south east corner of 77 Bloor West at 5:15pm.

Yesterday a peregrine circled above the Bay and Bloor area about 6 times at 4:40pm.

Friday June 16, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  The local female was on the top of the west CIBC logo between 5:20 and 6:00am.  Windwhistler-Spike arrived on the south side of the same building at 5:40, remaining there until 6:55am.

Saturday June 17, 2000
Bruce Massey reports:  The first of the Toronto chicks took flight on Thursday evening, June 15, at 6:10 pm.  It flew first to the King Edward Hotel, and will therefore be known as "King Eddie".  He has spent the past day and a half gradually regaining altitude, and although his flights and landings aren't great yet, he hasn't encountered any serious problems.  Victoria and Kingsley also both seem to be keeping a close eye on him.  The other two chicks remain on the nest ledge for now, but could leave at any time.  Additional volunteer help for the Fledgling Watch is still required, especially for the early morning hours (5-8 am) when the birds are often active, but few people have come out for so far.  If you can help, please call me at (416) 319-9662.

Harry Crawford reports:  At 6:25am the local female was in a south CIBC slot; she moved to the north west corner of the building at 6:35 and was gone from view at 7:00am.  At 10:45am an unidentified peregrine was circling above the CIBC building.

Sunday June 18, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:   All three chicks are now flying ... more or less!  Adelaide, the young female, took her first flight this morning just after 6:30 am.  Unfortunately, she wasn't quite ready for it yet, as she looked quite awkward in the air.  Within a few hours she had ended up on the ground, in the entrance to an underground parking garage.  A quick rescue was performed shortly after noon and she was brought to Wendy Hunter at the Toronto Humane Society for assessment.  Thankfully there appeared to be no injuries, and she was released earlier this evening.

Around the same time that Adelaide was being picked up, Cyrano decided it was time to leave the confines of the nest ledge.  He made it over to 1 Toronto Street, but also with a somewhat faltering flight.  He came down to lower rooftops later in the day, but did not experience any real troubles.  The older male, King Eddie, has been gradually gaining flights skills.

Harry Crawford reports:  When I returned home at 12:25pm, both peregrines were on the CIBC building -- Windwhistler-Spike mid way up the west side and the local female in a concrete slot just above him.  They remained there until 2:35pm.  About 4:00pm I thought I saw some activity on the roof of 55 Bloor West.  Sure enough, 15 minutes later, a very wet local female appeared on the south edge of the roof.  She dried out and preened until 6:50pm when she flew away.  Windwhistler-Spike appeared on the south ledge mid way up the south side of the CIBC building at 4:45pm.  He ate a small object and hung around until 5:40.

Monday June 19, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:   King Eddie and Cyrano were both in sight throughout the morning, but Adelaide proved more elusive.  Although there were a couple of glimpses of a peregrine flight that might have been her, we could never confirm these sightings.  By late afternoon, we were becoming quite discouraged that we were having no success locating her.  Fortunately, Neil Ruberry discovered Adelaide on a rooftop patio at Church and King in the early evening.  Adelaide had trapped herself in a corner, and was frantically trying to climb up a slanted metal pipe to escape, but with little success.  Each time she dropped back down, her wings caught on a rough metal edge in an awkward position and we were concerned that she could injure herself if this persisted.  Mark Nash moved in to capture her, and met with little resistance.  We returned to the Toronto Humane Society with her, where Wendy Hunter examined her again.  There appeared to be some bruising of the wings, as well as the mouth, and the bird responded slowly to light being shone on the eyes.  It was decided to hold Adelaide overnight for further monitoring and reassessment in the morning.

Meanwhile, Cyrano has also kept us busy.  He spent much of the day on an 8th floor ledge on the north side of King Street, overlooking the traffic just below.  It was mid-afternoon by the time he took off, on a somewhat wobbly flight which took him around the south end of the King Edward Hotel.  He spent the rest of the day on that building, though he did move around on the rooftop a fair bit.

Eddie progressed dramatically today.  Around 3 pm, he was on the roof of the King Edward Hotel, splashing around in a puddle.  From there he took off, and gradually gained height as he circled to the northwest.  Eventually joined in the air by Victoria, he nearly reached the lower "step" of the Scotia Tower (more than 50 storeys high), then veered south and made a fairly good landing on the roof of the BCE tower.  Later in the day he again soared high together with both Victoria and Kingsley, and eventually did succeed in reaching the perches high on the Scotia Tower.

Harry Crawford reports:  At 5:50am Windwhistler-Spike was on the top of the south facing CIBC logo.  He disappeared at 6:40am.  The local female was on the south east corner of the Bay roof at 5:50am.  She moved to south east corner of the CIBC building at 6:15 and eventually disappeared at 6:30am.

Tuesday June 20, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:   I have been in contact with Bruce Massey over the course of the day, and can report the following from the downtown site:  Eddie has continued to impress with strong flights today.  Although he has been out of sight for extended periods, watchers are not too concerned about him at the moment.  Cyrano, on the other hand, has taken over from Adelaide as the problem child of the family.  He was seen flying east from the King Edward Hotel fairly early in the morning, but has not been spotted since.  Kingsley and Victoria have been flying to the east, and it is suspected that they can see him, but to this point he is eluding our detection.  The search will continue in the morning.

Adelaide was reassessed this morning, and it was decided that it would be wise to send her to the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph for x-rays and a more complete examination.  We expect to have news on her within a day or two.

On a different note, I visited the midtown peregrines today.  Walking south on Avenue Road below Dupont, I spotted a female peregrine on the top floor northwest ledge of the Four Seasons Hotel, and a male on the northeast ledge at the same level.  The female had just landed there with prey, and I thought / hoped that his might be an indication of an active nest at the site.  Nelson Jordet of the Four Seasons engineering department graciously agreed to take me up to the roof to check on the situation.  Unfortunately, there were no eggs or chicks to be seen, but we did learn that the perch where the female was spotted is a favourite feeding spot, with lots of remains scattered around.  It remains possible that the peregrines are breeding elsewhere, but it may also be that they are simply selecting spots for next year - this building would certainly be suitable, and we will keep monitoring it, among others.

Wednesday June 21, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:   Unfortunately today we had another of the Toronto fledglings come down, requiring medical attention.  At around 9:30 am, engineer Les Sylvester was on the job at 199 Bay Street, when he happened across King Eddie trapped in the boiler room.  Surprised to see the bird there, he contacted Paul Bayliss, the manager of building services, who summoned the Toronto Humane Society to rescue it.  Mr. Sylvester watched over Eddie until the rescue crew arrived.  We suspect that Eddie reached the boiler room by falling down a chimney and escaping it through a vent.  This bird was very lucky to survive the fall, let alone to be discovered relatively quickly.

King Eddie was examined at the Toronto Humane Society, where burns to his feet were assessed (presumably from having made contact with the active boiler).  Otherwise, however, he appeared to be a very strong and feisty bird.  In the afternoon, I brought him to the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph for treatment and monitoring.

Thursday June 22, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:   King Eddie was given a full examination this morning, which revealed that aside from his feet, he is in great shape.  Some skin had peeled off his feet, and the skin underneath is tender, so he will be kept at the Ontario Veterinary College for a few days as a precaution, so that he doesn't reopen the wounds when released back to the wild.

Meanwhile, Cyrano continues to elude observers.  Over the past 48 hours, there have been a couple of fleeting glimpses of a bird which may have been him, but none of these have been confirmed.  So it could be that he has been missing for at least this long.  The possibilities are endless, in terms of the number of chimneys, vents, etc. that he could have fallen down.  However, we are still holding out hope that he is alive and well somewhere, and will sooner or later fly back into view.

Alan Kirschbaum reports:  I've recently been seeing peregrines on the Whitney block and on the science building at U of T.  Once at the Whitney block the peregrine stooped a short distance, what a sight.  The U of T sighting was also interesting.  The peregrine was on the tower and took off and when I found it again it was back at the same spot bent over and eating.  This all happened in seconds. I moved over to College west of Queen's Park Cres., but it was gone.  There were two, or maybe three what I think were Peregrines circling very fast to the west. 

Friday June 23, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:   The full-scale search for Cyrano has been called off.  It has now been three full days since the last confirmed sighting of him, and the odds are not good that he will be found at this point.  Bruce Massey and his volunteer crew have spent the past couple of days scouring possible locations from the ground, and have also scanned the area on several occasions from high rooftops, but have found no clues to lead them to Cyrano.  The behaviour of the adult peregrines also suggests that Cyrano may be gone - Kingsley and Victoria yesterday left food packets at different locations, as if hoping that one of their missing chicks would find it, but they clearly did not know where to find any of them.  Hopefully we will be able to return both Adelaide and King Eddie relatively shortly, but sadly the odds of Cyrano coming back are slim.

Considering that Eddie was found in a boiler room below a chimney, and at least two other Toronto fledglings have fallen down chimneys in past years, we are asking that maintenance/engineering staff at all buildings in the area (University to Sherbourne, Front to Dundas) check their chimneys, boiler rooms, etc. just in case Cyrano has met a similar fate.  Please report any findings immediately to the Canadian Peregrine Foundation at (416) 481-1233, or myself at (416) 896-6608.

Alan Kirschbaum reports:  Given the nice weather I wend to King and Victoria this morning to enjoy the view.  It was the opposite of Thursday.  Today I saw one peregrine for 10 minutes out of the hour, while yesterday there was one in view almost all of the time.  Furthermore, they were more active on Thursday.  What was nice, was when the peregrine landed on the Church on Church and King.  It sat on the steeple near the top.  I guess I need better camera now, just kidding.

I also went for a walk around Queen's Park and this is what I saw.  While sitting at the north end of Queen's Park I checked out the CIBC and Bay buildings.  Sure enough there was a peregrine sitting on the upper window ledge on the West side of the CIBC building.  It sat for some time, longer than I was prepared to sit and look at it from such a distance, just facing the building.  The sun was not yet on that side of the building, so it was probably nice and cool.

I then walked south through the park and past the Legislature building. While I was walking past, I heard a peregrine calling and looked up to see two peregrines flying directly overhead.  One landed on the tower of the U of T science building, while the other appeared to keep going.  It sat on the tower for 10 minutes and then flew off to the West.  The park area seems to be part of a route the peregrines from Yonge and Bloor use.

Harry Crawford reports:   At 5:30am the local female was on the top of the south facing CIBC logo.  She moved into a west facing slot mid way up the building at 6:30 and to the south west mid ledge at 8:00am.  I left the area at this time, returning at 11:55am.  At that time she was on the west side of the CIBC building and remained there until 1:15pm.

Until today, there hasn't been much activity in the area.  It seems that the local female often spends the night on the CIBC building.

Saturday June 24, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 5:25am the local female was on the top of the south facing CIBC logo.  She flew over to the south east corner of 77 Bloor West at 6:10 and disappeared 5 minutes later.  At 10:20 she was on the middle west side of the CIBC building.  This view was from the street.  Since I can't see this part of the ledge from the apartment, I don't know how long she was there.

Sunday June 25, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  At 8:20am the local female was on the south east corner of the CIBC building.  At 8:55 she briefly moved into a south facing slot and then immediately flew around to the north of the building.  9:40 found her in a west mid slot -- disappearing from view at 1:45pm.

Monday June 26, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  The local female was on the top of the south facing CIBC logo at first light, 5:45am.  She left the spot at 5:55.  When I returned to the area at 12:00pm, she was in a middle slot on the west side of the same building.  She alternated between an upper and middle slot until disappearing at 2:05pm.

An afternoon walking tour of the area with Bruce Massey found Windwhistler-Spike midway up the north side of the CIBC building. The local female was on the north side of the Four Seasons Hotel. At 7:05pm Windwhistler-Spike was eating on the south east corner midway up the CIBC building.  He was gone by 7:35pm.

Tuesday June 27, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  The local female was in a south CIBC slot between 5:30 and 5:50am. She returned to a slot midway up the west side of the building between 7:20 and 7:45; disappeared, returning at 8:20am. At 12:30pm she flew over to the west area of the roof of 55 Bloor West.  I then passed the sighting off to Katherine Rich.  At 12:45 she was back in the same area of the CIBC building, finally disappearing from view at 2:00pm.

Wednesday June 28, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  Both peregrines were on the south facing CIBC logo at daybreak (5:30am).  The local female was on the top and Windwhistler-Spike was on the bottom.  They were both gone by 5:55am.

Thursday June 29, 2000
Harry Crawford reports:  The resident female started on the south west corner of the CIBC building at 8:10am.  She moved to the top of the south logo at 8:25 and then into a west slot mid way up the building at 8:50, waiting out the rain.  She disappeared at 1:30pm.

Friday June 30, 2000
Marcel Gahbauer reports:   Today Adelaide was released back in Toronto, after nearly two weeks of rehabilitation.  She had been transferred from the Ontario Veterinary College to the Owl Foundation in Vineland on Tuesday, so that she could spend a few days in a flight cage to build up her strength in preparation for her release.  Since she had experienced only a minor injury, and has had a problem-free recovery, we decided to include her in Project Track-em, our study of the dispersal and migration patterns of eastern peregrine falcons.  Yesterday we fitted her with a satellite transmitter while at the Owl Foundation - the transmitter and neoprene harness together weight only 40 grams, which is well under 5% of the weight of the bird.  The attachment procedure lasted only twenty minutes, after which Adelaide was returned to the flight cage to practice flying with the transmitter on.  As in the past, we noticed that Adelaide paid little attention to the new backpack she was wearing, and it had no impact on her flight at all.

It was shortly after 10 am this morning that we released Adelaide from the roof of 18 King Street East, adjacent to the nest ledge.  Adelaide had clearly had more than enough of our company, as she immediately flew across the street to perch on the King Edward Hotel.  Although short, it was a good first flight, with a controlled landing.  As we stood on the roof, admiring Adelaide from a distance, Victoria discovered us, and set about dispatching us from the roof.  She made several attacks, coming to within a couple of metres to us, and presenting her talons as she swooped up at the last moment before impact.  We retreated to street level and watched from below as Adelaide made a couple of additional short flights.

In the afternoon, we were having difficulty locating Adelaide, and gained access to the roof of the King Edward Hotel to survey the surroundings.  Ironically, around the same time, volunteers at street level spotted Adelaide at Toronto and Court streets - one of the few spots we couldn't view from the roof.  However, we were instead treated to some spectacular flights by the adults.  On a couple of occasions, both Kingsley and Victoria circled off to the east, using the thermals to full advantage.  Within a matter of a couple of minutes, they covered the distance from the Scotia Tower east to the mouth of the Don River.  From there they continued on at least as far as the base of the Leslie Spit (Tommy Thompson Park).  While returning from one of these flights, Victoria spotted a pigeon traveling the opposite direction just beneath her, and with hardly any effort at all snatched it out of the air and returned to the old CIBC building to prepare her meal.

Later in the day, Adelaide was visited by the local kestrels, and endured their attacks quite well.  Adelaide did eventually receive food from her parents, and things seemed to be returning to normal with the downtown family by the end of the day.

Harry Crawford reports:  The resident female peregrine was on the south east corner of the CIBC building at 8:45am.  She was still there when I left the area at 9:10am.  Windwhistler-Spike was briefly on the top of the south facing CIBC logo at 2:50pm.

 

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