!!! Zanar has hatchlings!

June 01, 2012 - New York - Prescott-Ogdensburg Bridge

CPF Postmaster Reports:

June 1st - 2012
As you know, the old nest box located on the Prescott-Ogdensburg bridge was relocated from the Canadian side of the bridge last year and moved to the Ogdensburg USA side.
The resident territorial adult female named “Zanar” - (who was produced at the Crowne Plazza hotel in Ottawa in 2004) was successful in attracting a new mate this spring and there is good news regarding their efforts. The pair have been successful in hatching several of their eggs this season and have hatchlings in nest box!

!!!

May 10, 2012 - New York - Prescott-Ogdensburg Bridge

CPF Postmaster Reports:

May 10th - 2012
We have received some interesting news from Mary Beth in NY USA
She writes:

I have good news,,-Zanar has produced four eggs in the nest box and has a handsome new mate, who has not been banded. The box was relocated to the US side last fall because of the deck project.
The crew also added two sheets of 8×4 plywood in front of the box to allow for more walking room. I hope it helps. The crew will be checking for chicks next week.
I’ll let you know what I find.
Hope you have a great season.
Talk to you soon.
best,
Mary Beth Warburton - N.Y. USA

!!! Sad news to report from Prescott-Ogdensburg bridge nest site!

February 03, 2012 - New York - Prescott-Ogdensburg Bridge

CPF Postmaster Reports:

Well, the male peregrine from the Ogdens. bridge was found dead in East Aurora, N.Y., (near Buffalo) on the roof of a school. It appears he slammed into the heating unit on the roof and died from head injuries. Sounds like he may have in pursuit of prey and didn’t swerve when he needed to. It is so sad. He was only 5. It will be interesting to see what happens this season.

Sorry to have to share bad news.
Take care,
Mary Beth

!!! New Pollutants Found In Peregrine Falcon Eggs

November 11, 2011 - New York - Prescott-Ogdensburg Bridge

Frank Butson Reports:

While poking around the internet,I found this article posted at e! Science News. So all will see it,it is being posted on each of our nestsite pages. This is too important to miss.

The original article can be seen here: http://esciencenews.com/articles/2011/04/18/new.pollutants.detected.peregrine.falcon.eggs 

Here is what it says:
New pollutants detected in peregrine falcon eggs
Published: Monday, April 18, 2011 - 09:04 in Earth & Climate

Flame retardants are chemical compounds added to fabrics and plastics to keep them from burning easily, but these can be toxic. Now a team of researchers from Spain and Canada has detected some of these emerging pollutants for the first time in peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) eggs in both countries. “The presence of ‘dechlorane plus’ and other related, chlorinated compounds used as flame retardants have been detected for the first time in the European biota (flora and fauna of the region)”, explains Ethel Eljarrat, co-author of the study and scientist at the Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Studies (IDAEA-CSIC, Spain).

The researchers have found these substances in peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) eggs in both Spain and Canada. The flame retardants are often added to textiles, electronic circuits and other products to inhibit or resist the spread of fire, but can be transferred to the environment.

In nature these compounds are “bioaccumulating and bioconcentrating” all along the food chain, as evidenced by the research published in the Environmental Science & Technology journal. The international research team for this study was led by Begoña Jiménez of the Institute of Organic Chemistry (CSIC, Spain), and Environment Canada researchers, Kim Fernie and Mehran Alaee.

Having received the relevant permits, eggs that had failed to hatch from various active falcon nests in Canada and Spain, were collected. The collection involved 13 eggs from Spain (five in Guadalajara – a territory representative of an inland habitat of the Iberian Peninsula - and eight in Bilbao - representing a coastal environment), and 12 eggs from Canada (Great Lakes Region and Eastern provinces).

The levels of some of the measured contaminants have been found to be somewhat higher in Bilbao than in Guadalajara, and the authors believe this may be due partially to the difference in the falcons’ diet: more aquatic in the former and more terrestrial in the latter. In fact, if fish is highly contaminated, peregrines would accumulate more of the harmful substances. While peregrine falcons do not eat fish, they prey upon other birds, some of which may eat fish.

Selecting the peregrine falcon was no accident. This species was endangered in many areas of the northern hemisphere due to the use of organochlorinated pesticides, particularly DDT, though when this was prohibited in the 1970s the populations recovered. Furthermore, falcons are at the top end of the food chain and accumulate substances carried by their prey.

Highest levels in the Canadian samples

The results reveal that the concentrations of ‘dechlorane plus’ and some of the other chlorinated halogens were “significantly higher” in the Canadian falcons’ eggs than in those of Spain. The reason for this could be that the industry that has manufactured these compounds for decades (although they are now also produced in China) is located in New York State close to the area where samples were collected. In addition, the use of these compounds has generally been higher in North America than Europe.

The researcher acknowledges that the effects that these flame retardants may have on the falcons’ eggs or on their development are still unknown, “but their detection is a first step”. These are emerging pollutants, which comprise both those which have appeared more recently and those that have been used for a long time but are just lately the subject of environmental interest.

Other flame retardants, including some brominated flame retardants, have already been confirmed as toxic endocrine disruptors, and their use has been prohibited in some of the commercial mixes in Europe and America. Furthermore, they are candidates for inclusion on a list of Persistent Organic Pollutants to be eliminated, a list compiled by the Stockholm Convention which includes other pollutants such as DDT or dioxins.

This study forms part of the doctoral thesis submitted this month by the researcher Paula Guerra from IDAEA on “The analysis of emerging halogenated flame retardants and their impact on the environment and on humans”. All of the eggs were analyzed by her during her exchange studies at Environment Canada.

A research group at IDAEA led by Damià Barceló has also confirmed the presence of these compounds in sediment and fish in the rivers of the Ebro basin (Spain). Source:FECYT-Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

!!! Zenar is back with a mate and currently incubating 4 eggs!

May 06, 2011 - New York - Prescott-Ogdensburg Bridge

CPF Postmaster Reports:

While we haven’t had any news from Mary Beth for some time, it has been reported by Eve that Zanar (hatched in Rochester NY in 2006) and her mate are currently incubating 4 eggs again this year on the bridge. We are to understand that they are currently being monitored by Mary Beth Warburton from New York State. We do not know which site of the bridge the birds have set up house on this year - (the Canadian or American side) and have no idea as to when the eggs were laid adn when ful time incubation started.
We can only hope that the final out come is better than last year!
Hopefully we’ll receive some news of the happenings.
Stay tuned…..

!!! 2010 Update - and Sad news to report.

September 30, 2010 - New York - Prescott-Ogdensburg Bridge

CPF Postmaster Reports:

    Sept. 2010

From Mary Beth Washburton - New York state - Very sad that 3 of the 4 chicks did not survive, BUT the one that did had quite a journey. The surviving chick was rescued from the river when it was about a week away from fledging. She spent two nights in rehab and I took her back to the bridge and she made it!!

    Postmaster Notes:
    While this high fledgling mortality is a typical happening at most bridge nesting sites where the nests are directly over large spans of water, it is still never the less heart braking to see this happen year after year at these same sites. While many man made structures can offer an incredibly good nesting situation, some (as in this case) are not so safe. As always, a big part of the equation and success is as we have all said, location, location, location!

!!! The best is yet to come! Keep your eyes to the skies!

June 22, 2010 - Windsor - Ambassador Bridge

CPF Postmaster Reports:

While the “kids” maybe away from the house (or should I say the nest ledge) throughout the day, it may only for a short time depending on the nest site. Now that the juveniles are flighted, they are investigating their new world and they will be honing their new flight skills. While they will be difficult to see them for the most parts throughout the day, they are still very dependant on their parents for food and protection for many weeks to follow.

Remember that the resident adults still have the hardest part of their job still to come. Protection, feeding and training the “teenagers” to hunt and fend for themselves.

For the next 30 to 90 days - (depending on the advancement of each individual fledgling), the juveniles may still be utilizing the nest ledge and still sleeping there at nights, as this is still the only home that they have ever known. Also, remember that this still remains the occupied territory of the resident adults, and these territories (and the nest ledge itself) are still very much under the resident adults control. It is their territory and it will still be protected from all intruders!

Unlike the “non-urban” nesting falcons, most of the urban nesting adult pairs remain on territory all year long and continue to defend the nest ledge and territory throughout the entire year, even during non nesting times.

A far as the juveniles are concerned, their adult parents still have to teach them all of the life skills that the they will have to learn to survive to adulthood, (or should I say, just to survive another day)!!

By mid September, thousands of years of hard wired instincts will have the young juveniles head south on a migration and with upwards of an 80% mortality and many perils and risks ahead of them, the youngsters will need all of the help that they can just to survive their first year. The adult parents have their job cut out for them trying to teach the juveniles how, what and where to hunt food, and how to recognize and escape from all of the “bad guys” out there.

Stay tuned, and keep your eyes to the skies over the next few weeks in and around the nest sites as the best viewing is yet to come!

!!! Zanar has been located, and with her new family of four!

June 11, 2010 - New York - Prescott-Ogdensburg Bridge

CPF Postmaster Reports:

We have just received some great news from Mary Beth down in New York state.
She has been closely monitoring the nesting activities of the Ogdensburg bridge peregrines and in addition to finding out that the pair have in fact produced four hatchlings this year, and nesting on the Canadian side,,, she has been able to identify the band number of the resident adult female!
I just checked the band number against our records and we have been able to positively identify the identity of the resident adult female as being named “ Zanar”,, produced at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Ottawa Ontario on 2004, banded Black 69 over Black K, with a sliver USFW band # 168705686

Zanar was banded at 25 days old, 920 grams – (empty crop weight), June 11th 2004
Thanks You Mary Beth!

!!! Zanar has been located, and with her new family of four!

June 11, 2010 - Ottawa - Delta Ottawa City Centre

CPF Postmaster Reports:

We have just received some great news from Mary Beth down in New York state.
She has been closely monitoring the nesting activities of the Ogdensburg bridge peregrines and in addition to finding out that the pair have in fact produced four hatchlings this year, and nesting on the Canadian side,,, she has been able to identify the band number of the resident adult female!
I just checked the band number against our records and we have been able to positively identify the identity of the resident adult female as being named “ Zanar”,, produced at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Ottawa Ontario on 2004, banded Black 69 over Black K, with a sliver USFW band # 168705686

Zanar was banded at 25 days old, 920 grams – (empty crop weight), June 11th 2004
Thanks You Mary Beth!

!!! Prescott / Ogdensburg bridge hatch!

May 19, 2010 - New York - Prescott-Ogdensburg Bridge

Mark Nash Reports:

Just received great news from Mary Beth in New York state that she has been able to confirm a hatch of at least two hatchlings as of Wednesday May 19th - 2010. They believe that the hatch date was May 17th and confirms that the adults are in fact nesting on the Canadian side!

Hi Mark,
Long time no see. As of today (Wed. 5/19/10) it looks like there are 2 chicks on the Ogdensburg bridge and they have nested on the Canadian side and we wanted to let you know about the chicks in case you are interested in banding them. Hatch date est. to be 5/17/10. I know you are usually very busy at this time but let me know.
Thanks.
Mary Beth