!!! Despite the ongoing painting at the lower elevations below the nest ledge, its still life as usual on the upper ledges!

February 20, 2015 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

CPF Postmaster Reports:

February 20th - 2015
Despite the record cold temps here in southern Ontario, and the on-going painting of the building at the lower elevations, its life as usual on the nest ledge as clearly seen via the nest web cams! A quick peek, and a quick snapshot, finds one of the resident adults on the nest ledge eating a fresh kill for the morning breakfast.
Pigeons beware,, its still not a safe place to be if you are a pigeon!!

That being said, we have confirmed reports of both O’Connor and Jack being the resident adults on site with no evidence of any territorial challenges having been observed of late. While the season is still very early, and with the southern wintering over migrant peregrines not yet on their way back from the far south wintering grounds, their still is plenty of time for drama when the season starts to heat up!!

Lets hope that Jack stays a little closer to his Etobicoke Bloor & Islington territory this spring to help O’Connor guard and watch over the territory! As many of you know, Jack has had a girlfriend at another nest site in west Etobicoke for several years now, and has been successfully producing offspring at this other nest site simultaneously. He has been double-timing it with both O’Connor and another adult female at the other nest site and has so far been successful in his efforts in holding two different nest site territories, both with young having been produced at same!!

Again, time will tell as to whether he will be able to keep this up for much longer given all of the recent competition and territorial squabbles that have been observed of late!

On another note, we have been successfull in building the new nest tray that will eventually replace the other nest tray that is in much need of replacement!

With a huge thank you to the new building management who sponsored and funded the new nest tray!

Our visit to the nest ledge last fall while we spent some time with the painters on the swing stage, gave us a great opportunity to inspect the aging nest tray. While it has held-up well for the past 17 years, it is in much need of being replaced! We were able to get a few more screws in it and topped it up with some pea-gravel, we will realize that it must be replaced soon, as it has succumb to the harsh elements over the last 17 years, and is starting to show signs of rot.

We’re hoping that we will be able get a ride with the window washers early this spring before the nesting season to replace the old nest tray with one of our new and improved models. We are now building all of the new nest boxes and nest trays out of the new marine poly-composite material that already comes pre-coloured at the manufacturing process and no-longer needs to be re-stained every few years!! The new marine composite material is UV and water resistant!!

This new composite material is better than the older pressure treated material, and even better than the cedar material that we once used. While the new material is very expensive, very heavy and very difficult to work with, weighting twice the weight of the equivalent sized wood boards, having to pre-drill everything and requiring special fasteners and screws, its a material that comes with a 25 year warrantee and will not succumb to the harsh weather elements that all of the nest boxes and nest tray have had to deal with. Also remembering, that access to most of the nest ledges is expensive and complicated due the fact that we require other professionals, outside equipment and operators to get us to many of the nest ledges. Both timing and the weather also presents some challenges for all to be able to get to the nest ledges to do any maintenance on the nest ledges.

Stay tuned……..


!!! Territorial battles lands Surge with some injuries. He is expected to have a full recovery!

January 24, 2015 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

CPF Postmaster Reports:

Saturday Jan 24th - 2015
While many of us may have settled in for the duration of the cold snowy winter months, there are a number of battlefields still very active much closer to home than you would expect!

Just after 9am this morning, we received a call from the Hamilton Animal control that explained that an injured adult black banded peregrine falcon was observed on the sidewalk near Eastwood Park, a short distance from the HMCS Haida. Moments later, we were receiving e-mail from Sue McCreadie in Burlington, along with photos of the injured peregrine in an effort to learn its identity.

It didn’t take but a few moments to check the banding database to get an identify on the injured peregrine,, and sadly must report that injured peregrine is non other than Surge, Black banded 7 over 8,, who is the resident territorial adult male from the Hamilton Sheraton hotel nest site. See photos attached, courtesy of Shaena who was able to snap some identification shots before and after his recovery. While his injuries didn’t appear to be life threatening, it was obvious that he had been involved in a full contact dispute with another raptor, and as a precaution, he would be taken to the Owl Foundation for a further more detailed examination and treatment if necessary..

Sue e-mail explained that he was on his way to the TOF

By 12:30pm, we had received a serious of e-mail communication from the Owl Foundation with an initial diagnosis of his examination and some photos, and again at 6:00pm with a more detailed diagnosis of Surge’s injuries.

While there were no witnesses to Surge’s grounding, most of his superficial injuries are very consistent to that of squabbling with another bird of pray, with some punctures and some damage to his cere that is also consistent with injuries having been sustained as a result of fighting with another raptor and making some hard contact with concrete. (Concrete always wins) :-(

The better news is that none of his injuries are life threatening, and failing any complications of infections, the current routine of antibiotics and worming meds he is being given should have him back to good health in two weeks time. Other good news, is with regards to his intake weight. He weighted in at 751 grams. After checking his 2002 banding records, we know that he was 669 grams (empty crop weight) at his banding when he was 28 days old.

At almost 15 years of age now, Surge is still of very good weight (and although this is his heavier winter weight), it is, never the less, a very healthy weight for a wild male peregrine adult. The lack of external parasites is another very good indication of his overall health and body condition.

The owl foundation was kind enough to sent along some of Surge’s photos that were taken during his intake, and other photos taken of him after a second more detailed examination,, (and a caution that some are a little graphic),, although no where near as bad as we have had to deal with over the 18 years. We have held off posting the more graphic shots.

For all those that have forgotten, Surge was produced in 2002 at the Etobicoke Bloor & Islington nest site in Etobicoke Ontario. Hi obviously was successful in his fledging (with only one rescue from the streets during the fledge watch), and ended up calling the Burling Bridge nest site his home in 2004 - 2005 for only that year.

As a very inexperienced young adult, he was unable to take and hold this territory and was displaced (a polite way of say, he was run out of town) from the Burlington Bridge nest site by another older more experienced male. The following year, Surge ended up coming to Hamilton and displaced the resident adult male at the Hamilton Sheraton hotel. Surge has been nesting and producing at the Hamilton Sheraton hotel since 2006, and has been the resident territorial male ever since. Madam-X - (A.K.A. - Run-around Sue as she was named by the Penn. USA falcon watch team in 1999, the year Madam X was hatched. She has been the resident territorial female at the Hamilton Sheraton nest site since 2001.

So as you can see by this one short story of only Surge’s events, the meek do not inherit the earth - (or in these cases, at least do not inherit the peregrine nesting territory).

Over the past month, we have documented seven other cases of territorial disputes with resident peregrines trying to defend and protect their territories here in southern Ontario from hostile takeovers. We have a few surprises to announce with regards to the successful “take-overs” that have already occurred,,, AND waiting for the results of other ongoing hostile take-over events. Stay tuned on this front, as its just beginning!!

As for Surge, we are very confidant of him having a speedy, successful recovery given the care he is receiving and we will report updated news as to his progress as it comes in from TOF.

This would be the time to get down to the Hamilton Sheraton to see “who” if any, is now on territory??? And the obvious question remain,, where is Madam X (a.k.a - Runaround-Sue)?? And if Surge was in fact injured during squabbles with another peregrine for the territory, who, if anyone, has replaced Surge??


!!! Territorial dispute and Surge ends up with some injuries! We expect him to have a full recovery!

January 24, 2015 - Hamilton - Sheraton Hotel

CPF Postmaster Reports:

Saturday Jan 24th - 2015
While many of us may have settled in for the duration of the cold snowy winter months, there are a number of battlefields still very active much closer to home than you would expect!

Just after 9am this morning, we received a call from the Hamilton Animal control that explained that an injured adult black banded peregrine falcon was observed on the sidewalk near Eastwood Park, a short distance from the HMCS Haida. Moments later, we were receiving e-mail from Sue McCreadie in Burlington, along with photos of the injured peregrine in an effort to learn its identity.

It didn’t but a few moments to check the banding database to get an identify on the injured peregrine,, and sadly must report that injured peregrine is non other than Surge, Black banded 7 over 8,, who is the resident territorial adult male from the Hamilton Sheraton hotel nest site. See photos attached, courtesy of Shaena who was able to snap some identification shots before and after his recovery. While his injuries didn’t appear to be life threatening, it was obvious that he had been involved in a full contact dispute with another raptor, and as a precaution, he would be taken to the Owl Foundation for a further more detailed examination and treatment if necessary..

Sue e-mail explained that he was on his way to the TOF

By 12:30pm, we had received a serious of e-mail communication from the Owl Foundation with an initial diagnosis of his examination and some photos, and again at 6:00pm with a more detailed diagnosis of Surge’s injuries.

While there were no witnesses to Surge’s grounding, most of his superficial injuries are very consistent to that of squabbling with another bird of pray, with some punctures and some damage to his cere that is also consistent with injuries having been sustained as a result of fighting with another raptor and making some hard contact with concrete. (Concrete always wins) :-(

The better news is that none of his injuries are life threatening, and failing any complications of infections, the current routine of antibiotics and worming meds he is being given should have him back to good health in two weeks time. Other good news, is with regards to his intake weight. He weighted in at 751 grams. After checking his 2002 banding records, we know that he was 669 grams (empty crop weight) at his banding when he was only 28 days.

At almost 15 years old now, Surge is still of very good weight (and although this is his heavier winter weight), it is, never the less, a very healthy weight for a wild male peregrine adult. The lack of external parasites is another very good indication of his overall health and body condition.

The owl foundation has sent along some of Surge’s photos during intake, and other photos taken of him after a second more detailed examination,, (and a caution that some are a little graphic),, although no where near as bad as we have had to deal with over the 18 years. We have held off posting the more graphic shots.

For all those that have forgotten, Surge was produced in 2002 at the Etobicoke Bloor & Islington nest site in Etobicoke Ontario. Hi obviously was successful in his fledging (with only one rescue from the streets during the fledge watch), and ended up calling the Burling Bridge nest site his home in 2004 - 2005 for only that year.

As a very inexperienced young adult, he was unable to take and hold this territory and was displaced (a polite way of say, he was run out of town) from the Burlington Bridge nest site by another older more experienced male. The following year, Surge ended up coming to Hamilton and displaced the resident adult male at the Hamilton Sheraton hotel. Surge has been nesting and producing at the Hamilton Sheraton hotel since 2006, and has been the resident territorial male ever since. Madam-X - (A.K.A. - Run-around Sue as she was named by the Penn. USA falcon watch team in 1999, the year Madam X was hatched. She has been the resident territorial female at the Hamilton Sheraton nest site since 2001.

So as you can see by this one short story of only Surge’s events, the meek do not inherit the earth - (or in these cases, at least do not inherit the peregrine nesting territory).

Over the past month, we have documented seven other cases of territorial disputes with resident peregrines trying to defend and protect their territories here in southern Ontario from hostile takeovers. We have a few surprises to announce with regards to the successful “take-overs” that have already occurred,,, AND waiting for the results of other ongoing hostile take-over events. Stay tuned on this front, as its just beginning!!

As for Surge, we are very confidant of him having a speedy, successful recovery given the care he is receiving and we will report updated news as to his progress as it comes in from TOF.

This would be the time to get down to the Hamilton Sheraton to see “who” if any, is now on territory??? And the obvious question remain,, where is Madam X (a.k.a - Runaround-Sue)?? And if Surge was in fact injured during squabbles with another peregrine for the territory, who, if anyone, has replaced Surge??


Enjoying the Sun

January 11, 2015 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

Kathy Reports:

A rare sunny and warmer day today and both Jack and O’Connor are home enjoying the sun!


The Final Coat to Jack’s Ledge is Complete

December 21, 2014 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

Tracy Simpson Reports:

Today I met with the painters for the final coat to be applied to the south facing ledge of the east tower.  I arrived early and stopped in at Eagle Road and Bloor for a look around in the hopes of spotting the resident adults.  Oh I found them alright…  …Jack was sitting in O’Connors spot on the camera with a nice crop and looking ready for a nap.  As I panned with my binoculars across the ledge at first I wasn’t sure what I was seeing but yes…  …that large lump sticking up just above the edge of the ledge was indeed O’Connors head and bulbous crop.  I snapped a few pictures from below and checked in on the camera and there she was on the edge of the tray also napping the morning away.  I went into the lobby and met up with the crew to get ready for our final ascent on this ledge.

We gathered gear and headed outside to the mezzanine level for our lift.  I checked the ledge and saw that Jack had left his roost.  I checked the web camera image for O’Connor and she had also left her roost.  I scanned around for the two but could not immediately find them so we loaded the stage and made ready to go.  It was then I looked up to where we were headed and saw O’Connor sitting on the west arm of the swing stage looking back down at us.  Hmmmm.

We began our lift and I watched her as we went.  She looked down at us but remained roosting the whole time.  As we approached the ledge we stopped and waited for her to move off but she remained quite content to stay there.  We went a little higher and still no reaction.  We continued to go up a few feet and give her time to acclimatize to our presence and I was at the ready should she come in for a closer look.  It was as we were almost at our destination that she decided to take off and flew directly over to the Kingsway on the Park roof to continue roosting.

As the painters set about completing the south face and ledge I continued to watch for Jack and O’Connor.  Halfway through our task Jack flew out from the east side of the east tower and around to the west tower Moneris sign.  O’Connor followed moments later and there the two remained until our task was complete.  It was only as we were descending for the day that O’Connor reappeared to the south and flew out and around the nest tower to the Aberfoyle side of the building.

I will post the camera shots and pictures that I took today shortly so check back soon for some images of the resident adults.

Painting at the Islington and Bloor Centre Continues

December 21, 2014 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

Tracy Simpson Reports:

Post for Saturday Dec 20th

This Saturday was an amazing day for the painting to continue with mild temperatures and sunshine.  The ledge that we were now working on was the ledge to the west of the nest ledge that Jack likes to use as a hangout and food prep area.  When I arrived, O’Connor was in her favorite position on top of the web camera roosting in the sun and Jack was not in my view.  I met with the painters in the east lobby and as we were gathering up gear and setting our game plan, the pigeons on Aberfoyle went wild.  I went outside and caught sight of O’Connor out on a morning hunt.  Back inside we went and up to the east mezzanine to prepare to lift.  We were greeted by a trickle down shower of feathers from above, the hunt most obviously was successful.  With a full crop she was now hopefully set for a nap.

Our lift to the top and paint applications went very well without so much as a peep from the resident adults.  O’Connor made one flight out to the west and appeared to swoop up to the west tower Moneris sign which is one of her favored roosts.  The painters were able to tape off, measure and apply the first coat of paint to this face of the building and make things ready for the final coat to be added on Sunday.  All went well and the weather cooperated to make the job run smoothly.

Painting of this ledge will continue Sunday and if all goes well will be completed then.

!!! Painting is almost completed! Now to Jack’s ledge on the south side of the east tower.

December 19, 2014 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

Mark Nash Reports:

Friday December 19th - 2014
A good day,,, and the painting is almost completed at the upper elevations around the nest ledge. We arrived this morning to observe one of the resident falcons perched on top of the nest ledge camera. By the time the swing stage got to the nest level, it had flown off, so I can’t tell you which of the two resident falcons was on the camera.

Throughout the day the falcons didn’t make an appearance, and we got a good safe undisturbed go-round! The second camera was uncovered as the final paint was applied and the painters will not have to return to this particular elevation again as the painting has been completed. One, perhaps two more days on the south side of the east tower, (in particular, the south east ledge that Jack can usually be found roosting and prepping food). His man cave :-) I guess you could call it.

Tomorrow, Tracy from the CPF will be attending with the painters to ensure that everything goes safe and well for all. Hopefully the milder weather will hold out that may allow the painters to be able to complete both the first and second coats of black and white paint at this elevation around this ledge. Lets prey it doesn’t rain again!!!!

Stay tuned for Tracy’s report…….


!!! Weather delays for painting completion. Resident peregrines back on the nest ledge to inspect the new paint job.

December 17, 2014 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

Mark Nash Reports:

December 15th & 17th - 2014

While the weather has not been very cooperative with rain, fog, rain and more rain, it obviously hasn’t prevented the local resident peregrines from carrying on with their day to day routines.

Painting has been held up for the past two days because of heavy fog and constant rain and we have not been able to proceed since Monday of this week. I guess we shouldn’t complain, as it has been seasonally mild, almost warm in comparison to the past to weeks and thank goodness its not been snowing!

While both of the peregrines were not seen on Monday when painting resumed, today, (Wednesday Dec. 17th), I had a brief opportunity to take a peak through one of the web camera’s via my smart phone, and snapped and saved a photo of one of the resident peregrines roosting on the nest tray. Sadly, I couldn’t tell who it was - (O’Connor or Jack) due to the small screen shot on my older smart phone.

For those of you e-mailing us regarding the other camera, we still have it covered with protective plastic to protect it from the second coat of paint that still needs to be applied to the elevations around it.

Stay tuned, I will back with the painters tomorrow if the weather improves while they finish up the painting at this elevation, and will remove the plastic camera covering from camera number two.
Stay tuned………..


!!! Finally Painting continues, (after being hampered by some really bad weather over the past few days, with Snow, Rain and some very blustry winds)!!

December 13, 2014 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

Mark Nash Reports:

Saturday Dec. 13th - 2014
Finally, the bad weather let up, gaving the painters an opportunity to get back to their painting tasks (at least for a few hours today) and they were once again hurrying along to get paint applied. Moments after getting to the lower roof elevation where the swing stage was waiting, it was quite obvious that both the resident peregrines - (Jack and O’Connor) were already very actively involved in a territorial dispute with a pair of Red-tailed hawks.

High above the Bloor & Islington centre office towers, we witnessed both resident peregrines diving and stooping on a pair of Red-tailed hawks as we watched the Red-tails twist, turn and rolled up side down in an effort to avoid being struck by the two diving and stooping peregrines. This is NOT a good neighbourhood to be flying around at any time of the year, especially if your another raptor!!

It didn’t take long for O’Connor and Jack to force the two adult Red-tails out of the territory and out of sight! That being said, this provided an ideal opportunity for us to get into the swing stage and allowed the painters to get on with the painting given that both the resident peregrines were distracted and obviously very busy to the south west while chasing off the two Red-tailed hawks. For the next four hours we had a peregrine-free time frame that allowed the painters to carry on with their painting activities at the upper elevation.

Sadly, just when all was going well, the paint compressor failed and ceased to function that ended their peregrine-free opportunity to carry on with their painting activities.

After more than a hour trying to get the paint compressor to function properly, the painters had to call it a day and we returned to the lower level and quit for the day.

Back on Monday next week.
Stay tuned………

!!! Everything is well! Painting proceeds, Both O’Conner and Jack are very much on site and looking good!!

December 08, 2014 - Etobicoke - Sun Life Centre

CPF Postmaster Reports:

December 8th - 2014
Just a quickly update to let everyone know that everything is well out at the Etobicoke nest site with both the building painting activities and the peregrines. For the past week, the Canadian Peregrine Foundation has had a staff member on site working with the painters to ensure that both the painters and the birds are safe. Mark Nash from the CPF has been on the window washers swing stage providing cover and protection for the two painters and ensuring that the peregrines are not hurt during the painting process. As many of you have been watching both locally and on the CPF’s nest camera, the entire exterior of the three office towers of the newly renamed Bloor and Islington Place are being painted, including that of the upper elevations,, including the nest ledge itself.

Other good news is that the nest tray has been serviced - (in part), with some additional pea-gravel having been added to the nest tray, and allot of the old debris has been removed. We also took this opportunity to take critical measurements so that the new nest tray can be manufactured and will be installed next year. While the nest tray has served the peregrines well, it is in much need of replacement. Remembering that we installed this nest tray back in 1997!!

It is worth noting that we have now seen both Jack (the resident adult male and the resident adult female - O’Connor throughout). O’Connor was on hand today to express her opinion of our activity in and around her nest ledge. In typical O’Connor fashion, and with the silence and stealth we have known to expect of her, she appeared out of nowhere, stooped and dive-bombed us a half a dozen times this afternoon, with several toooo-close for comfort dives, making contact with the broom on several occasions.

As you know, the straw broom is utilized to provide an elevated target, one that allows the peregrines an easy soft target allowing them to vent their aggression out on, while protecting the other humans on the swing stage, thus allowing them to carry on with their work activities throughout any attacks.

While the use of a straw broom worked quite well as we expected, O’Connor still managed to have us all ducking below the safety of swing stage rails throughout most of her aerial assault, as she is simply just toooo fast to get out her way!!!

She was convincing enough to have the painters hurry along to get the nest ledge area completed in record time and quickly move out of the nest ledge area!! As you may have also noticed, both cameras were covered up and wrapped in plastic to protect them from any paint over-spray that might have got onto the camera lens.

We have several more days (weather permitting) to complete the painting at this elevation. Remembering that there are still two other ledges at this elevation that heed to be painted, in addition to the areas above the nest ledge level. The remaining ledges are the ledges that Jack uses as a regular butcher block to prepare food and a roosting spot. I expect that we will also receive an additional scolding when we are at this elevation.

The great news, is that the nest ledge looks good, and the pale white colour is not intrusive at all.
Stay tuned,,