!!! Still involved in courtship! No incubation as yet!

April 12, 2014 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

CPF Volunteer Reports:

April 12th - 2014
A quick visit to check in on the Hearn peregrines this afternoon resulted in some good observations. Both adults were quite visible and very active for the several hours that we were down at Hearn this afternoon.

Peter, the resident adult male, was still very busy courting his gal and on two occasions he brought her small food packages, followed by several rounds of copulation and mating.

During the several hours of observations, the un-banded resident adult female spent most of her time roosting on various levels of the superstructure and at no time did she give up any of her choice of potential nesting spots. Peter spent most of his free time chasing the local avian inhabitants out of the territory and tending to his courtship activities.

More time in will be the only way that we are going to find out where she has decided to lay her eggs.
Stay tuned ………………

!!! Lots of copulation going on, but no incubation observed as yet! Where will she lay her eggs???

April 01, 2014 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

CPF Postmaster Reports:

March 31st - 2014
I was able to spend several hours down at the Hearn plant on Unwin Ave this evening and spotted both the resident adults on site moments after my arrival. For the next several hours, (until 8pm and my light faded), both birds were in full view for the most parts in their usual roosting spots with multiple computations observed.

While I was unable to identify leg band numbers or colours due to the distances involved, I was able to confirm that the resident adult female is NOT banded. Sadly, the resident adult male never came lower than the mid elevation of the superstructure, and due to the poor lighting conditions, there was no way of getting close enough to him even with a 75 power spotting scope eyepiece to see if he was banded, let alone actually identifying any leg band digits.

As you can see by the attached photos of the resident adult female, both of her legs are void of any leg bands. The resident adult male of the last few years at Hearn was a Black Banded male named Peter that was produced in Hamilton Ontario, at the Hamilton Sheraton Hotel nest site. We are looking to confirm his leg band number to see if it is still Peter. He dawns a solid Black recovery band on one leg and the usual Silver USFW band on the other leg.

Throughout my observations, the resident adult male went on several hunts, and was successful on two occasions in his efforts in capturing and killing food. He brought food into the female and dined on the second kill himself.

Even after a big meal and several copulations, the female did not give up the location where she intends to lay her eggs as she was visible throughout my entire observation period.

Its going to take a few more visits and some very close observations to find out where she has decided to lay her eggs!

Egg production is close, as they are busy copulating and egg fertilization and egg laying is very close!
Looking for any and all assistance if you are down at the Hearn location to do some observations and let us know what you are seeing…..

Stay tuned, more to come………..


!!! A not so private moment at Hearn! Copulation and egg production is underway!!

March 31, 2014 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

CPF Postmaster Reports:

March 27th - 2014
Hello Guys
I witnessed this at the Hearn Generating Station on Unwin Avenue just after 1:00pm March 27th. It is a terrible photo because they were just too far away but if you can use it please feel free to.

Cheers.
Paul Reeves


!!! Spring is in the air at Hearn as Peter & Angela are once again very visible.

March 27, 2014 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

CPF Postmaster Reports:

March 27th - 2014
Hey Guys,

I just wanted to give you an update on the observations they we gathered at the old Hearn power plant. For the past week, there has been two peregrines back hanging around the plant - (most likely Angela and Peter). They were observed copulating yesterday and again today. Lets hope that they pick a good nest site this year. Talk to you soon.
Desmond

Peter and Angela Visible Again at Hearn

July 25, 2013 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

Bruce Massey Reports:

On Sunday I was down to visit the Hearn Generating Station in an effort to re-sight Peter and Angela in the territory.  When I arrived, I scanned all of the usual ledges that they roost on and found Peter on the stack.  He made several forays from this location and each time returned to the territory.  I carefully checked the ledge that they were last seen incubating on and there was no sign of Angela or any young.  I made my way back around to an area that affords me a view of the north side of the plant but was unable to locate Angela or any other peregrine in that view.  I can say for certain though that Peter was the male on site today holding the territory as evidenced by a scope view of his band.  Later this week, one of our watchers in the area reported that both Peter and Angela are visible again on the south side of the main building but that they believe the pair has again failed in their efforts to produce young this year.  It was good to hear that the pair is still on territory and maintaining the site and we look forward to them finding the perfect ledge next year for successfully hatching offspring.  We will continue to check in on them throughout the year so watch for updates to come.

!!! A third failed nesting attempt, and now, the pair appear to have abandoned the territory altogether?

July 05, 2013 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

Mark Nash Reports:

June 29th and July 5th -2013
Sorry for the lack of updates and postings as we have still been in the field on the watch at several other nest sites and had to mobilize our available manpower and resources to other areas of most need.

As you know, there is only so many of us that are actually mobile with vehicles and the ability to get around to the many nest sites to do a physical check,, and given that we are still very back-logged with observation reports that we have yet to get posted, (most of them being delivered to us by phone call-ins) as opposed to these folks doing their own web site postings), it has as you might imagine, been a monumental task to get everything logged, written down, and eventually posted after being in the streets ourselves 16 plus hours a day. By the time many of us get home in the evenings after a 14 to 16 hour stint in the streets on the watch, finally getting home most often only arriving after 11pm, its all that most of us can do just to get something to eat and crawl into bed, knowing that 5am comes early again and we’re back out into the streets on the fledge watch for another 15 plus hours the nest day!

That being said, we are still very active doing spot checks in between the still ongoing fledge watches and the Hearn nest site has not gone unchecked.

While this is an older update (from Saturday June 1st) I combination with the most recent update from yesterday - (June 5th), both observation reports are consistent, in that it would appear that Peter and his mate have finally given up on their nesting activities, AND appear to have abandoned the site altogether.

I was personally down to Hearn on Saturday June 29th after coming from the Yellow Pages fledge watch, and spent several hours until darkness and never observed any peregrine activity at all. While not unusual for the most parts given the incredible expanse of the Hearn plant , you can usually see activity in the later evening hours just before dark during their prime hunting times, (this especially given that their is a territorial nesting pair on site). Sadly, the most recent observation report that was just received yesterday - (Friday July 5th) by one of our local watchers, confirms that there has been no activity at the nest site itself and also concludes that the pair have abandoned the site.

It is most confusing that the pair might have actually abandoned the territory altogether?? Only time will tell and we will be soon be able to ramp up our monitoring in a few days after the last of the intense fledge watches are completed. We have had to re-start a fledge watch at the Etobicoke Bloor & Islington nest site due to the re-release of little “Lizzy” that has spent the last 9 days under intensive care after colliding with a window and suffered partial paralyzes as a result of the spinal swelling.

the good news for her, is that she has been released back to her parent care in record time, and is now starting to fly again. The best news, is that both of her parents are attending and both she and one of her younger siblings have teamed up and seem inseparable together.

Obviously, any and all observations of the Hearn site is most welcomed, as we are understandably both a little confused at the recent happenings. While we often see failed nest attempts, total abandonment of the territory by a pair that have already have a real affinity to the territory is very unusual indeed.

Your assiastance is most needed to help us do some observations at this site.
Stay tuned………………….

!!! Hearn peregrines are back on their second clutch of eggs, starting over!

May 17, 2013 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

Mark Nash Reports:

May 17th - 2013
A great day indeed in the field for me today with a very successful and very productive day gathering information at several other nest sites that were on my list to visit, combined with clear sunny conditions and allot of good luck, I finished off my day at the Hearn nest site to get an update on the Peter and his new mate.

I can confirm that they are back at it, with incubation duties being observed on their second clutch of eggs, starting over in another location.

It didn’t take me long to locate Peter, (the resident adult male) who was observed on several locations on the superstructure overlooking and guarding his territory, but I must admit it did take me some time to scan the entire superstructure with my binoculars to finally locate his mate, who appeared to be down on full time incubation duties, on a horizontal steel beam tucked in behind some of the white metal wall flashing.

Shortly after I located her, (and only able to see the end of her tail and wing tips that stuck out from behind the metal flashing), Peter did eventually fly in to relieve his mate for a very short period of time. The change-over, (or changing of the guard as we say), happen very quickly,, in only a few seconds as he disappeared in behind the metal flashing from my view. Moments later after hearing the pair squawking to one another, the female suddenly appeared from behind the white metal flashing and flew off out around the building and out of my view. The entire event was over in less than six seconds!!

Needless to say, it would appear that the pair maybe once again involved in incubation activities (now for their second time,, if not their third attempt).

Stay tuned, more to come…….


Angela and Peter at Hearn Still Active

May 10, 2013 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

Bruce Massey Reports:

I stopped by this past Sunday to check up on Angela and Peter’s progress this nesting season.  With the first two attempts at incubating eggs not having worked out, the hope was that they might yet find the perfect spot to raise young this year.  When I arrived I had both adults on site and in view so it was clear from the outset that they were not incubating eggs.  Peter is still vigorously defending the territory and Angela is staying close to the site.  Even so, I cannot see at this time any ledge of interest or eggs being incubated.  I will continue to spot check down here and report in what they pair are up to.

Mating Continues at Hearn

April 28, 2013 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

Bruce Massey Reports:

I was down to visit Peter and Angela on Sunday to check on their progress after they abandoned their nest last week.  I found both adults in view on the main building and often times using the platform up on the back of the stack to roost and preen.  Peter continues to mate with Angela but it is unclear whether they will have eggs and where.  I will continue to update you on the progress of Hearn this nesting season and we hope that they pair settle on a suitable ledge soon.

Second Attempt at Hearn Has Failed

April 23, 2013 - Toronto - Hearn Power Station

Bruce Massey Reports:

Peter and Angela have been working on a clutch of two eggs in the old nest ledge that was used last year and they have struggled over the past week to ensure that both eggs were under their protective care.  Of the two adults, it was Angela that was having the most difficulty arranging both eggs beneath her and often the egg closest to the edge of the ledge went uncovered outside of her wing.  Peter on the other hand was all over those eggs and worked for hours to finally get them both properly beneath him. 

With them having a challenging time positioning their eggs, I thought it would be prudent to head down and check on their progress and so I attended the site this past Sunday April 21st.  I found the nest cavity empty and both adults off site.  It wasn’t long after I arrived that the adults returned but neither of them entered the ledge to continue incubation.  I attempted to find the eggs with the spotting scope but the one closest to the edge was now clearly gone.  The one that was further back may have been present but I was not able to confirm its presence in the ledge.  What was clear without a doubt was that this clutch was not being attended to by either adult.  Peter was now showing an interest in another ledge to the left of the most recent scrape and managed to entice Angela to join him for a look.  He was his usual self in defence of the territory addressing two Red Tailed hawks, a Kestrel and a Cormorant.  I did witness the pair mating twice throughout my observation period indicating that they may not be done for the season quite yet but the bulk of the adults time was spent roosting and preening on the roof of the main building.  At the end of the day, Peter did make a spectacular attempt at a pigeon that was flying north towards the plant.  He made a direct flight out towards it and snatched the bird in mid-flight without missing a wing beat.  He attempted to carry his heavy load back to the main building but Angela met him out over the yard and tried for a transfer.  The pigeon was dropped and disappeared from my view and I don’t believe that it was recovered by either adult.

We certainly hope that Peter and Angela are able to sort out a good nesting location this year and settle in on a clutch this season.  Last year’s success has Peter rather excited to try and we will continue to monitor and update you on their progress.